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Hybodus Agassiz 1837
Pronounced
High-BO-duss
Dorsal spine

Meaning

From Bernissart (in Belgium)
Classification

Elasmobranchi
Hybodontidae Owen 1846

Hybodus basanus Egerton, 1845

Stratigraphy
Wessex and Vectis
Lifestyle
This shark would have eaten fish and scavenged floating carcasses.
Locality
Between Compton Grange and Hanover Point.

Description of Material

Hybodus is known from teeth and fin spines. The teeth are high with a slender cusp and a circular cross-section. The spines are quite long, with longitudinal striations and two rose of triangular denticles along the posterior length. The morphology of Hybodus teeth varies between species, so may be more of a morphotype than an actual genus

Simon Clabby 2006
   

Hylaeobatis Woodward, 1916
Pronounced
HI-lee-oh-BAT-iss

Meaning

From Bernissart (in Belgium)
Classification

Chondrichthyes
Myliobatidae Bonaparte 1838

Hylaeobatis problematica Woodward, 1916

Stratigraphy
Wessex Formation
Lifestyle
This shark would have eaten molluscs, using it's crushing teeth to crush the shells.
Locality
Unknown

Description of Material

Lonchidiid with crushing-type dentition with weak heterodonty. The teeth are transversely elongated, oval to rectangular in occlusal view. The occlusal surface is ornamented with reticulate folds, somewhat tumid but with no cusp being differentiated. There is a labial protuberance almost absent from all teeth; root massive with well-developed foramina on lingual face.

Simon Clabby 2008
   

Lonchiodion Estes, 1964
Pronounced
LON-chee-OH-dee-on

Meaning

From Bernissart (in Belgium)
Classification

Elasmobranchi
Lonchidiidae, Herman 1977

Lonchiodion sp.

Stratigraphy
Vectis Formation
Lifestyle
This shark would have eaten fish, floating material and anything small enough for it to kill.
Locality
Unknown

Description of Material

Lonchidiid with crushing-type dentition with weak heterodonty. The teeth are transversely elongated, oval to rectangular in occlusal view. The occlusal surface is ornamented with reticulate folds, somewhat tumid but with no cusp being differentiated. There is a labial protuberance almost absent from all teeth; root massive with well-developed foramina on lingual face.

Simon Clabby 2006
   

Palaeoscyllium Wagner, 1857, non Marck, 1863
Pronounced
Owe-ENN-ee-ah-SOO-kuss

Meaning

Owen's Crocodile
Classification

Elasmobranchii
Orectolobiformes Applegate 1972

Palaeoscyllium aff. formosum Wagner, 1857

Stratigraphy
Wessex Formation
Lifestyle
This shark would have eaten fish, floating material and anything small enough for it to kill. Unusually for this genus, it lived in non-marine waters, with low salinities.
Locality
Yaverland point, near Sandown

Description of Material

Small teeth showing moderate heterodonty. Single main cusp is moderately high and erect or slightly angled to posterior. Little or no crown shoulder at base of cusp and lateral cusplets absent or incipient. Labial face flat and unornamented in anterior teeth, with short and strong vertical ridges in lateral teeth, never extending onto main cusp. Hemiaulacorhize root low and V-shaped, with root lobes forming an angle of 60-90 degrees. root lobes parallel sided and basal face of root largely flat. Small foramina are very well developed at junction of root lobes; foramina also present along linguo-lateral side of root. Lingual extremity of root sharply angled and with large foramina.

From Underwood and Ward 200

Simon Clabby 2006
   

Pronounced
VECK-tiss-ELL-ak-oss

Meaning

Vectis shark
Classification

Elasmobranchi
Lonchidiidae, Herman 1977

Vectiselachos ornatus Woodward, 1916

Stratigraphy
Wessex Formation
Lifestyle
This shark would have eaten molluscs, using it's crushing teeth to crush the shells.
Locality
Brook bay

Description of Material

Lonchidiid with pronounced crushing-type dentition; anterior teeth bulky with well demarcated cusp and labial protuberance, weakly ornamented, primarily with striations and rarely with granulae; lateral teeth lower, more heavily ornamented, always with granulae; labial protuberance in laterals poorly developed or absent; root markedly smaller than crown and comparably thin.
Simon Clabby 2006
   

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