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Latest News!
30th November 2009

A recent paper by Galton has confirmed that the Isle of Wight Regnosaurus specimen is actually from a basal Iguanodontid.

The paper can be found here - http://www.ville-ge.ch/mhng/paleo/paleo-pdf/28-1/pal-28-1-11.pdf

29th September 2009

Hello! Just a couple of changes to mention. Firstly, izfree.com has closed for business, so dinowight has now got it's own paid-for domain, www.dinowight.org.uk. it can still be accessed through www.dinowight.co.uk, which will remain the primary address, but from now on, addresses like www.dinowight.org.uk/iguanodon.html will take you to the actual address!

However, what this does mean is that now DinoWight is costing money to run, so we need your help. As some of you may have noticed, there are adverts on all DinoWight pages. We've tried to make them as unobstusive as possible though!

Also, we are accepting Paypal donations, which will go towards paying for the upkeep of the site. We're not asking for massive donations, just however much you think is suitable.

16th June 2009

The Isle of Wight has a new dinosaur, an indet. tetanuran theropod (MIWG 6350)

More general information on tetanurans can be found HERE, and the paper about the new Isle of Wight specimen can be found on DinoWight ONLINE, plus there is an excellent report on this, as well as the palaeoecological implications, at Darren Naish's Tetrapod Zoology blog.

18th May 2009

The Isle of Wight has a yet another new dinosaur, an Rebbachisaurid.

Rebbachisaurids are believed to be part of the Diplodocoidea, distant relatives of Diplodocus. This latest example from the Isle of Wight is the second, after a tooth which is still awaiting publication.

More general information on Rebbachisaurids can be found HERE, and the paper about the new Isle of Wight specimen can be found on DinoWight ONLINE

10th October 2008

The Isle of Wight has a new dinosaur, a Rebbachisaurid.

Rebbachisaurids are believed to be part of the Diplodocoidea, distant relatives of Diplodocus. This latest example from the Isle of Wight is the second, after a tooth which is still awaiting publication.

More general information on Rebbachisaurids can be found HERE, and the paper about the new Isle of Wight specimen can be found on DinoWight ONLINE

28th April 2008

Well, DinoWight now has another New Look! We've dumped the frames, but the layout is much the same.

New features include a guide to what you need for fossil hunting, a guide to identifying dinosaur teeth, and The DinoWight shop, which sells books and tools.

And we're now on facebook as well!

6th August 2007

Well, as those of you who check the museums page will already know, Dinosaur Farm Museum has NOT closed permanently, it’s open for business and looking forward to your visit!

And may I also apologise to Barbara Phillips, who pointed out to me that I hadn’t updated the news page to reflect this change of circumstance, despite knowing about this since May. This has been to various difficulties at this end, which are hopefully resolved.

Anyway, go to Dinosaur Farm Museum, or at least visit the website. Details will be posted on DinoWight as they are known

7th December 2006

Sorry about the lack of news, not much going on until now. Not only have I shaved a few corners on DinoWight, but there is a new dinosaur page. Within the last few weeks a paper has been published, which shows that Iguanodon atherfieldensis does not belong in the genus Iguanodon. It is now called Mantellisaurus, which is a rubbish name but it's unfortunately valid. People don't seem to acknowledge that Suchomimus is a synonym of Baryonyx, but what can we do?

Also, Dinosaur Farm Museum has sadly closed it's doors permanently. It's a great shame, as it was the most convenient place for fossil hunters to get their finds identified, but there is still Prehistoric Island and Dinosaur Isle on the Island, so visit them instead.

15th March 2006
Due to recent work there has been a bit of shuffling of the sauropods. The major alterations are Chondrosteosaurus (Now a basal titanosauriform), Oplosaurus (Possibly a camarasaurid, but definitely some form of neosauropod) and the indet. diplodocoid is nothing of the sort.
September 22nd 2005
The new pterosaur has been named Caulkicephalus trimicrodon. More information can be found HERE (and they all thought I was going to leak the name early...)
January 18th 2005
List of "unofficial" dinosaurs added to DinoWight. For more information, see HERE!
November 20th 2004
DinoWight Exclusive! New evidence shows that a sauropod dinosaur 20 metres in length once lived on the Isle of Wight. More information HERE!
November 1st 2004

Many of you have been e-mailing me wanting to know when I update the information on DinoWight, and when anything new was going on, well I thought rather than having a special updates page I'd have a e-mail newsletter. It can be received by all members of DinoWight ONLINE, the DinoWight news group. As well as all the latest updates on DinoWight, it also has a few pdf's on it.

To sign up, just go to;

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DinoWightONLINE/

September 24th, 2004

At SVPCA 2004 held at the University of Leicester, Isle of Wight research palaeontologist Steve Sweetman provided an outline of the hitherto unknown microvertebrate fauna of the Wessex Formation. The fauna, which was isolated using bulk screening techniques, includes at least: -

3 ornithischians, 2 of which are small and one absolutely minute;
3 frogs;
3 salamanders;
1 albanerpetontid (a salamander-like creature);
8 lizards, including two anguimorphs and 6 scincomorphs;
5 mammals, including two multituberculates, a spalacotheriid, a gobiconodontid and a ?zatherian;
1 neoselachian shark.

Other important microfossils recovered include: -

5 ostracods;
2 gastropods;
a number of charophytes, seeds and spores.

In addition to the above, previously unrecorded teeth and other elements of the associated macrofauna have also been recovered. Among the teeth are morphotypes which appear to represent two new crocodile taxa and a number of small theropods, including a troodontid, although it was pointed out that some of these, including the troodontid teeth, may represent the teeth of taxa already known from skeletal remains.

Steve also reported the presence of Istiodactylus from various horizons in the Wessex Formation thus extending its range from the Upper Barremian - Early Aptian Vectis Formation to the base of the Barremian. He also mentioned the discovery in a private collection of teeth representing 2 new large theropods both of which, assuming tooth size to be a reliable guide, would have been about the same size as Neovenator.

Steve's work has significantly improved our knowledge of faunal diversity in the Wessex Formation ecosystem and new discoveries continue to be made as his work progresses.

19th July 2004

SVPCA Abstracts related to the Isle of Wight released online (reproduced here from SVPCA website)

1st May 2004

DinoWight has moved to www.dinowight.co.uk, although it will still be at the old GeoCities site for the foreseeable future

22nd December 2003

The teeth of a Velociraptorine dinosaur have been identified from the Isle of Wight

9th November 2003

A report from the British Dinosaur research Seminar, convened in Newport, IoW, on the 5th November 2003

16th August 2003

Addendum - The search facility has been removed

Introducing DinoWight SEARCH, a search engine that allows you to find any dinosaur, museum, locality or anything else you're looking for in DinoWight. DinoWight search is at the bottom of the menu bar on the left.

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